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Re-Cycle 3 Posters
$59.85
24x36" (x3) color posters CARBON IMPACT - Driving a gasoline powered car produces about 1 pound of carbon dioxide (CO2) per mile. (source) - Manufacturing a car also produces CO2. Over the lifetime of the average car, the manufacturing "cost" is about 1.1 pounds of CO2 per mile. (source) - Added together, this means that driving a car emits about 2.1 pounds of CO2 per mile. - This also means that driving electric cars won’t save us. Without any fossil fuel consumption, a car still "emits" 1.1 pounds of CO2 per mile because of the pollution created through manufacturing. - Riding a bicycle also uses fuel. Riding a bike burns calories. The more you exercise, the more you have to eat and food production has a CO2 impact. - The average rider produces 0.06 pounds of CO2 emissions per mile by way of consuming more food. This number goes up if that extra food is meat. It goes down if that extra food is kale. (source) - The CO2 "costs" of manufacturing a new bicycle are also about 0.06 pounds per mile. (source) - So riding a bike produces about 0.12 pounds of CO2 per mile, about 5% of a car's 2.1 pounds. - Walking burns almost 3 times as many calories per mile as bike riding. (source) - With no manufacturing "costs" walking produces about 0.18 pounds of CO2 per mile. It takes more calories to walk a mile than to bike a mile. (The manufacturing cost of shoes was not factored into these numbers.) MILES PER HOUR - A car can travel 60 miles in an hour. - A bicycle can cover 10 miles in an hour. (source) - A pedestrian can travel about 4 miles an hour. - Keep in mind that half of car trips taken by Americans are 3 miles or less (source) and that 10 miles gets you just about anywhere in Minneapolis/St. Paul. COST Nerdwallet.com has a great cost calculator for car ownership that breaks down purchase price ($372), fuel costs ($146), insurance ($98), maintenance ($99), and other miscellaneous fees ($12) on a per month basis. Put in your own data to see your car's total costs each month. Better yet, use your own data to see your BIKE'S total costs each month. - At Recovery Bike Shop we estimate the average customer spends $200 per year to commute by bicycle. - That's $500 every five years to buy a "new" bike every five years - plus $100 per year in maintenance for a moderate commuter. - That's $1000 per five years or $200 per year. - That's $16.67 per month. - The average bike commuter consumes more calories than the average car commuter. The cost of that increased food consumption is something like $1.87 per day. (source) - This means the food costs of bike commuting are $56.10 per month. - So, the costs of owning and operating a bike are something like $72.77 per month. - Of course, your health care costs will likely go down.
- Given that the "fuel" required for walking is three times that of biking on a per mile basis, we might surmise that the average walk-commuter must spend $168.30 per month on additional calories. (source) - However, it is probably less than this since a person that walks instead of bikes or drives is likely to cover fewer miles per day. We've assumed that the average walk-commuter travels something like half of the distance of a bike commuter each day. - This brings the cost of walking as transportation down to about $85 per month. Actually pretty comparable to bike-commuting. Of course this says nothing about the costs of kicks. These are the numbers reflected in the poster above. What the cost numbers don't show is that the average American drives 876 miles in a month. The average bike commuter comes no where near this. And walkers travel even less. So it is also helpful to look at these numbers on a per mile basis. - The average gasoline powered car costs about $0.83 per mile (including gas, purchase price, insurance, etc.). - The 2014 census says that the average bike commute is 19.3 minutes.
Re-Cycle Carbon Impact Poster
$19.95
24x36" color poster - Driving a gasoline powered car produces about 1 pound of carbon dioxide (CO2) per mile. (source) - Manufacturing a car also produces CO2. Over the lifetime of the average car, the manufacturing "cost" is about 1.1 pounds of CO2 per mile. (source) - Added together, this means that driving a car emits about 2.1 pounds of CO2 per mile. - This also means that driving electric cars won’t save us. Without any fossil fuel consumption, a car still "emits" 1.1 pounds of CO2 per mile because of the pollution created through manufacturing. - Riding a bicycle also uses fuel. Riding a bike burns calories. The more you exercise, the more you have to eat and food production has a CO2 impact. - The average rider produces 0.06 pounds of CO2 emissions per mile by way of consuming more food. This number goes up if that extra food is meat. It goes down if that extra food is kale. (source) - The CO2 "costs" of manufacturing a new bicycle are also about 0.06 pounds per mile. (source) - So riding a bike produces about 0.12 pounds of CO2 per mile, about 5% of a car's 2.1 pounds. - Walking burns almost 3 times as many calories per mile as bike riding. (source) - With no manufacturing "costs" walking produces about 0.18 pounds of CO2 per mile. It takes more calories to walk a mile than to bike a mile. (The manufacturing cost of shoes was not factored into these numbers.)
Re-Cycle Cost Poster
$19.95
24x26" color poster Nerdwallet.com has a great cost calculator for car ownership that breaks down purchase price ($372), fuel costs ($146), insurance ($98), maintenance ($99), and other miscellaneous fees ($12) on a per month basis. Put in your own data to see your car's total costs each month. Better yet, use your own data to see your BIKE'S total costs each month. - At Recovery Bike Shop we estimate the average customer spends $200 per year to commute by bicycle. - That's $500 every five years to buy a "new" bike every five years - plus $100 per year in maintenance for a moderate commuter. - That's $1000 per five years or $200 per year. - That's $16.67 per month. - The average bike commuter consumes more calories than the average car commuter. The cost of that increased food consumption is something like $1.87 per day. (source) - This means the food costs of bike commuting are $56.10 per month. - So, the costs of owning and operating a bike are something like $72.77 per month. - Of course, your health care costs will likely go down. - Given that the "fuel" required for walking is three times that of biking on a per mile basis, we might surmise that the average walk-commuter must spend $168.30 per month on additional calories. (source) - However, it is probably less than this since a person that walks instead of bikes or drives is likely to cover fewer miles per day. We've assumed that the average walk-commuter travels something like half of the distance of a bike commuter each day. - This brings the cost of walking as transportation down to about $85 per month. Actually pretty comparable to bike-commuting. Of course this says nothing about the costs of kicks. These are the numbers reflected in the poster above. What the cost numbers don't show is that the average American drives 876 miles in a month. The average bike commuter comes no where near this. And walkers travel even less. So it is also helpful to look at these numbers on a per mile basis. - The average gasoline powered car costs about $0.83 per mile (including gas, purchase price, insurance, etc.). - The 2014 census says that the average bike commute is 19.3 minutes. (source) - The average rider travels 11 miles per hour. (source) - So the average commute is about 3.5 miles. - Twice a day is 7 miles. - Assume 5 days a week and 251 work days per year and we get 148 miles per month. - Add another 102 miles (educated guess) for errands and riding to see friends and family and probably the average bike commuter puts on something like 250 miles per month. - That's about $0.30 per bike mile. Again, most of that is in additional food consumption.
Re-Cycle Miles Per Hour Poster
$19.95
24x36" color poster - A car can travel 60 miles in an hour. - A bicycle can cover 10 miles in an hour. (source) - A pedestrian can travel about 4 miles an hour. - Keep in mind that half of car trips taken by Americans are 3 miles or less (source) and that 10 miles gets you just about anywhere in Minneapolis/St. Paul.
Re-Cycle Trees Needed Poster
$19.95
24x36" color poster - AAA says the average American drives 29.2 miles per day. (source) That's 61.32 pounds of CO2. (source) - There are lots of kinds of trees with varying capacity to absorb CO2 and different lifespans and such, so we assumed the average tree absorbs 1000 pounds of CO2 over the course of a 50 year lifespan: 20 pounds per year, 0.05 pounds per day. (source) - This means the average American driver needs a forest of 1,119 trees to absorb or offset the CO2 emitted by driving a car. - If the average cyclist rides 12 miles per day, they will produce 1.44 pounds of CO2. - A person walking 8 miles per day will also produce 1.44 pounds of CO2. - Each of these people will require 26 living trees to offset their daily carbon footprint of transportation.
VeloPress Feed Zone Table
$24.95
Science shows it's not just what we eat that matters; eating together matters, too. Chef Biju Thomas and Dr. Allen Lim have returned to the kitchen to champion dinner, the most social meal of the day. In their third cookbook, Feed Zone Table, Biju and Allen offer 100 all-new recipes to bring friends and family to the table in a way that nourishes life and sport. Feed Zone Table will inspire your family-style dinners with a delicious line up of drinks, starters, main courses, side dishes, fresh sauces, and desserts. Biju rolls out easy techniques for making flavorful food that's fun to prepare and share. Enjoying dinnertime and eating well will nourish you, your family and friends--and your sports performance. Dr. Lim saw these benefits first-hand while working with professional athletes and shares new research on how social meals benefit everyone. Lim reveals why it matters--what science has to say about food, camaraderie, performance, and the pivotal role that the dinner table can play in an athlete's preparation. Sports are often an escape from life, but Feed Zone Table is a warm invitation back to the table. We perform best when we nourish our bodies and feed our souls. Bring great food and people together with Feed Zone Table and you'll feel the difference.
VeloPress Rocket Fuel
$24.95
In ROCKET FUEL, James Beard Award-winner Matt Kadey, RD, offers up innovative, delicious, and convenient real-food recipes to power everyday exercise and weekend adventures. Kadey's ingenious recipes include whole food snacks like pudding, muffins, bars, slushies, pancakes, bites, wraps, cakes, cups, and more. Whole foods are a healthier, tastier performance fuel than highly processed sports food products. With over 100 recipes in ROCKET FUEL, it's easier than ever to power up for workouts, recharge during halftime, or stay energized on the trail.
VeloPress Zinn & The Art Of Road Bike Maintenance, 5th Ed.
$26.95
Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance is the world's best-selling guide to bicycle repair and maintenance. From basic repairs like how to fix a flat tire to advanced overhauls of drivetrains and brakes, Lennard Zinn's clearly illustrated guide makes every bicycle repair and maintenance job easy for everyone. Lennard Zinn is the world's leading expert on bike maintenance and repair. His friendly step-by-step guide explains the tools you'll need and how to know you've done the job right. The book's two-color interior is easy to read€”even in a dimly-lit garage or workshop. Hundreds of hand-drawn illustrations and exploded parts diagrams show just the right level of detail to lead you through every bicycle repair task. This smartly organized guide shows how to repair new and old bicycles from top to bottom. In over 500 pages, Zinn's guide includes simple instructions for hundreds of bike maintenance and repair jobs: Basics: How to fix a flat tire, lube a bicycle chain, adjust the brakes; Emergency repairs: How to fix a broken chain, tighten loose spokes, repair a bent derailleur; Easy shifting: How to adjust shifters, derailleurs, and cables for clean and smooth shifting; Wheels: How to true a wheel, install a new tire, change a cassette, replace broken spokes, build your own wheels; Overhauls: How to service and replace pedals, chains and chainrings, saddles, handlebars, stems, headsets, forks, bottom brackets; New tech: How to maintain 11-speed systems, electronic and wireless shifters, disc brakes; Cyclocross: How to set up a 'cross bike for racing, select the right components, and make quick repairs; Troubleshooting: How to figure out what's wrong with any bike and fix it. Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance makes bicycle repair and maintenance easy, quick, affordable, and fun. With Zinn at your side, you'll know how to keep your bicycling running smoothly for years. What's New in Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance, 5th Ed.: More than 700 comprehensive illustrations and exploded views. New chapter on electronic shifting covers maintenance, service, repair, and troubleshooting of all Shimano, SRAM, and Campagnolo electronic shifting groups. New chapter on disc brakes covers maintenance, service, and repair of all hydraulic and mechanical systems. New tech covered in depth: through-axle forks, SRAM eTap wireless shifting, second generation Shimano and Campagnolo electronic shifting, direct-mount sidepull brakes, SRAM X-Sync 1x11 cyclocross systems, tubular tire gluing tapes. New troubleshooting chartsNew master guide to press-fit bottom brackets. Also covered in the 5th edition: All derailleur shifting systems (5-speed through 11-speed); all bottom bracket systems (cone-and-cup through press-fit); all brake systems (including caliper, V-brake, cantilever, and disc); all headset, stem, handlebar and fork systems; wheelbuilding for all bikes including cyclocross and disc-brake wheels; special sections on cyclocross throughout including troubleshooting, maintenance, service, repair, and equipment selection; updated and expanded torque tables; complete illustration index and complete subject index.
Skratch Labs Feed Zone Portables Cookbook
$24.95
Skratch Labs’ Feed Zone Portables Cookbook gives you real, delicious, and easy-to-make fuel for your next ride. Chef Biju Thomas and Dr. Allen Lim—a physiologist who has done extensive work with Pro Tour teams—teamed up to give you 75 simple recipes for food that travels well, tastes amazing, and gives you the energy you need to keep riding. The book focuses on delivering the right blend of macro and micro nutrients for training athletes in simple, flavorful recipes.
Skratch Labs The Feed Zone Cookbook
$24.95
Fueling yourself correctly at home is one of the most crucial aspects of athletic performance and all-around health. Skratch Labs’ Feed Zone Cookbook has 150 easy-to-follow recipes that are designed to give endurance athletes like you just what you need. Chef Biju Thomas teamed up with physiologist Dr. Allen Lim, whose time spent working with Pro Tour teams led to many of these delicious, healthful recipes. The Feed Zone focuses on delivering the right blend of macro and micro nutrients when you need them in simple, flavorful recipes.
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